20th-century-man:

Debbie Harry

(Source: nevergiveuuup89)

Anonymous Asked
QuestionWhat can I do to be a stand out client? I've been pierced a few times and always tip what I can $15-$25 (is that a good amount? Not enough?) I know I can be a bit squirmy when the actual piercing happens, but I try to stay still as I can. I've been reading about food tips and whatnot and was just wondering if there's something I can do to make a piercer's job a bit easier. :) thanks so much for your help! Answer

richardeffinivey:

Any piercer worth your time is more worried about your heart than they are about your wallet.  Hearty cash tips are totally welcome, but at the end of the day, you don’t need to buy our love.  Some piercers totally love snacks, others are picky eaters, so be careful with unannounced snacks as they might not go over super well. (for example, I’m allergic to bananas, and I feel like 1/2 the time a client tries to give me food, it’s full of them)  I’ve received all sorts of things as tips over the years, but it was the hugs, the teary-eyed thank yous, the original art, and those sorts of things that I’ll prize forever.  Money just gets spent.

If you want your piercer to think highly of you, be sure to let them take the lead with jewelry selection, ask them for their opinion on what looks good and what they think works best for you, and take great care of your piercings according to their instructions.  Stop by for check ups, and be someone they want to see come by. 

well put!

(Source: the-barfbag)

kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo
kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo

kahliaisamess:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

sirenitas como yo

(Source: bzdziagwa)

first time seeing @dustin143 since (what, 2009?) so @raspukin and I cooked him some pasta and hung out for a bit with him and his new ohio born puppy! safe travels home to New York, cuties! 🐶🐨🚀

lomographicsociety:

Femininity and Color: Vibrant Film Photography by Hana Haley
Eye catching is one way to put young photographer Hana Haley’s colorful photographs. http://bit.ly/1qMNxgb
lomographicsociety:

Femininity and Color: Vibrant Film Photography by Hana Haley
Eye catching is one way to put young photographer Hana Haley’s colorful photographs. http://bit.ly/1qMNxgb
lomographicsociety:

Femininity and Color: Vibrant Film Photography by Hana Haley
Eye catching is one way to put young photographer Hana Haley’s colorful photographs. http://bit.ly/1qMNxgb
lomographicsociety:

Femininity and Color: Vibrant Film Photography by Hana Haley
Eye catching is one way to put young photographer Hana Haley’s colorful photographs. http://bit.ly/1qMNxgb

lomographicsociety:

Femininity and Color: Vibrant Film Photography by Hana Haley

Eye catching is one way to put young photographer Hana Haley’s colorful photographs. http://bit.ly/1qMNxgb